Mako fin position

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Look at this kiteforum thread:
http://www.kiteforum.com/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=2355607&sid=5826ae92f9ce79529e751a495712e53f

I think it is interesting if OR or anyone else has tried moving the fins closer to the feet as described in the thread?

Kirk

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Core XR3 12M
Rise XPD 9M
Mako King
Mako Classic
Mako Wide


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I saw that post too and this was my responce! One love to the Crew! John Z

Alex!

Good on ya for experimenting with your board, you’d fit in well around here smile

I thought I’d jump in with some thoughts. There have been a number of guys in the Bay area experimenting with larger fins, up to 4.5”. We ship with 2.1” fins as standard but I personally like riding my Mako 140x40 with 3” fins that we intend to make available as accessories shortly (likely by the summer). They are still wake style fins w/o much curvature to them. If you want to play with these you can order customs for now from Rainbow or just wait until the summer when we come out with the production version.

In so far as loosing your edge in the midst of a hard turn goes I struggled with this for a full season with the Mako until I was speaking with some co-workers about it and was told to try driving my weight forward in the turns. I also thought I was not putting enough back foot pressure and so was really parking my weight on the back foot to hold the turn but in fact if you drive your weight forward and into the turn, much like you are supposed to when snowboarding, you will find the board rails super hard in the turn even with stock 2.1” fins.

All of this is not to discourage your experimentation, that’s the Ocean Rodeo way! However, do go out on your next session with the Mako and ride it hard on your front foot coming into and exiting your turns and you will be amazed at how hard you can hit the carves.

John Z - OR

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John A. Zimmerman
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Ocean Rodeo Sports Inc
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Ocean Rodeo Performance Over Hype!


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Johnz - 18 March 2009 05:49 PM

I saw that post too and this was my responce! One love to the Crew! John Z

Alex!

Good on ya for experimenting with your board, you’d fit in well around here smile

I thought I’d jump in with some thoughts. There have been a number of guys in the Bay area experimenting with larger fins, up to 4.5”. We ship with 2.1” fins as standard but I personally like riding my Mako 140x40 with 3” fins that we intend to make available as accessories shortly (likely by the summer). They are still wake style fins w/o much curvature to them. If you want to play with these you can order customs for now from Rainbow or just wait until the summer when we come out with the production version.

In so far as loosing your edge in the midst of a hard turn goes I struggled with this for a full season with the Mako until I was speaking with some co-workers about it and was told to try driving my weight forward in the turns. I also thought I was not putting enough back foot pressure and so was really parking my weight on the back foot to hold the turn but in fact if you drive your weight forward and into the turn, much like you are supposed to when snowboarding, you will find the board rails super hard in the turn even with stock 2.1” fins.

All of this is not to discourage your experimentation, that’s the Ocean Rodeo way! However, do go out on your next session with the Mako and ride it hard on your front foot coming into and exiting your turns and you will be amazed at how hard you can hit the carves.

John Z - OR

Interesting post.  I had heard from someone that they purposely tried to ‘submarine’ a Mako wide by placing most of their weight on the front foot and it just wouldn’t ‘submarine’ for him.  I wonder if the ‘big’ concave that the Mako wide has contributes to this.  It would kind of make sense to me that it wouldn’t turn very well with weight evenly distributed since it sounds like the Mako wide may actually ‘ride’ on a cushion of air; similiar to what tunnel hull racing boats do.  This ‘riding’ on a cushion of air is what probably helps to smooth out the chop.

Placing more weight on the front foot probably takes out some of the ‘cushion’ of air from beneath the Mako wide, allowing the board to ‘drop’ into the water more, thus allowing the rails make more contact with the water and allowing for better ‘carving’ turns.

Placing more weight on the back foot probably will take some of the ‘cushion’ of air from beneath the Mako wide, but not as much as placing more weight on the front foot because the ‘big’ concave would still be ‘exposed’ to the oncoming air while moving forward if more weight was placed on the rear foot; thus less of the board would be ‘dropped’ into the water when weight was placed on the rear of the board as opposed to when more of the weight was placed on the front of the board.

So in summary, more weight on the front of the Mako wide allows less air under the board than when more weight is on the back of the board.

I’m not an expert, but it’s just a thought.

Allen